The Art Of Jazz Presents Jazz Pairs

The Art of Jazz presents Jazz Pairs, a monthly blog post which presents two jazz recordings of a song, each by a different artist and featuring two different music styles.

Long a feature of our Art Of Jazz Seminars, Jazz Pairs help us engage, understand and enjoy the jazz art form at a deeper level. TAOJ will provide a brief text introduction and YouTube or Spotify  links to two recordings. Listen on Spotify or find the same recordings in Apple and other music services. Give yourself 5 to 10 minutes to listen, compare, notice sameness, differences, emphasis and styling. What did you observe and learn? What did you most enjoy? How will this lead you to discover and enjoy more music  by these and other artists?

TAOJ will post Jazz Pairs on the 3rd Sunday of each Month. Address suggestions, comments or questions to joseph@TAOJ.Org

December 2017 Jazz Pair: Body And Soul

Body and Soul renditions by Diana Krall and by John Coltrane. The song Body And Soul is a jazz classic written in 1930 by Edward Heyman, Robert Sour, Frank Eyton and Johnny Green.

Diana Jean Krall, OC, OBC (born November 16, 1964) is a Canadian jazz pianist and singer, known for her contralto vocals.[1] She has sold more than 6 million albums in the US and over 15 million worldwide. On December 11, 2009, Billboard magazine named her the second Jazz artist of the 2000–09 decade, establishing her as one of the best-selling artists of her time.

Learn more about Diana Krall and her music.

John William Coltrane, also known as “Trane” (September 23, 1926 – July 17, 1967),[1] was an American jazz saxophonist and composer. Working in the bebop and hard bop idioms early in his career, Coltrane helped pioneer the use of modes in jazz and was later at the forefront of free jazz. He led at least fifty recording sessions during his career, and appeared as a sideman on many albums by other musicians, including trumpeter Miles Davis and pianist Thelonious Monk.

Learn more about John Coltrane and his music.

Your comments, questions and suggestions welcome – write: joseph@taoj.org